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Promising Futures 2017

AIISP at the Native Nations Rising March on Washington, March 10, 2017

Chairman Archambault of the Standing Rock Sioux Nation with students, faculty, and community members

Ah-Theuh-Nyeh Hah: The Planting Moon

Welcome

The American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program (AIISP) at Cornell University welcomes you to the traditional homelands of the Cayuga People and the Haudenosaunee Confederacy at large. Steeped in the discourse of Indigeneity, AIISP provides a unique combination of American Indian and Indigenous Studies (AIIS) courses and other educational, social, and cultural opportunities to Native students. We recruit Native applicants from all parts of the United States, Canada, and from across the globe, through regional efforts and national conferences. Our student support staff helps students and their parents with all aspects of the admissions process.

AIISP Events Calendar

 

 

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Upcoming Events

The Seventh Fire: Film Screening and Panel Discussion

Apr 11 | 6:00 pm

Film screening and round table discussion about the criminal justice issues affecting Native Americans with Prof. Eric Cheyfitz, Prof. Gerald Torres, and Prof. Sheri Lynn Johnson...

Location: Myron Taylor Hall

The Seventh Fire: Film Screening and Panel Discussion

Apr 11 | 6:00 pm

Film screening and roundtable discussion about the criminal justice issues affecting Native Americans Native American Law Students Association (NALSA) event

Location: Myron Taylor Hall

"Our Blood is Currency: Indigenous Death, Economics and Resurgence"

Apr 14 | 12:00 pm

Prof. Dian Million (American Indian Studies, University of Washington) will speak as part of the American Studies Spring Colloquium series. A light lunch will be served.

Location: American Studies Seminar Room  | Event type: Lecture

Artist Lecture: Melanie Cervantes of Dignidad Rebelde

Apr 18 | 4:40 pm

Public lecture by Melanie Cervantes, co-founder of Dignidad Rebelede...

Location: Physical Sciences Building  | Event type: Lecture

Repossessing the Cayuga Homelands

Apr 24 | 1:25 pm

"Repossessing the Cayuga Homelands", a lecture by Chief Sam George of the Cayuga Nation through Prof. Troy Richardson's seminar: John Locke and the Philosophies of Dispossession

Location: Caldwell Hall

Current News

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NASAC receives Perkins Prize Honorable Mention for Work on Indigenous Peoples' Week

"Honorable mentions went to the Native American Students at Cornell (NASAC) and Black Students United (BSU). NASAC worked to achieve broader awareness of Indigenous people’s presence in the Cornell community, culminating in a series of campus activities, Indigenous Peoples’ Week, last fall."

Kathy Halbig Receives Barry J. White Memorial Award

At the Promising Futures dinner on March 17th, Student Services Associate Kathy Halbig received a much deserved award from the Native American Indian Education Association of New York. Congrats, Kathy!

AIISP student activism featured in Cornell Daily Sun

"This past Friday, Ransom and six other Cornell students left the University at 1 a.m to join thousands of Native Americans and allies streaming in from all corners of the country to march against the government’s actions in Standing Rock." Read more

Chairman Archambault, Global Cornell

“'In 2007 our tribe said we don’t want pipelines in our ancestral lands,' he said. 'We saw not only the bad in the social ills, but also the environmental ills of unregulated pipelines and fracking water.' In 2013 Standing Rock passed resolutions against the Keystone XL Pipeline.
'Our focus has been on our children,' Archambault said, explaining the emphasis of his chairmanship, which began in 2013. 'We can invest in our kids…and create the brilliant minds that will solve all the things that plague us. If we invest in them, they will have the answers in the future.'” Read more

Chairman Archambault, Cornell Chronicle

“One of the things I want to do is make sure that we create the hope that is necessary for the future… As long as I put a focus on the future, I can sleep at night,” said David Archambault II, chairman of Standing Rock Sioux Nation. Read more