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Welcome

The American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program (AIISP) provides a unique combination of American Indian and Indigenous Studies (AIIS) courses, student leadership opportunities, and an undergraduate residential experience at Akwe:kon, the first Native student residence hall in North America. The AIISP has affiliated faculty in the fields of Art, Art History, Anthropology, Archaeology, English, Fiber Science, History, Linguistics, and Natural Resources. The AIISP supports the Native American and Indigenous Students at Cornell (NAISAC), the American Indian and Engineering Society (AISES), the Indigenous Graduate Student Association (IGSA), Hawai’i Club and Pacific Islander Student Association, and the Native American Law Student Association (NALSA). Indigenous applicants are encouraged to contact student support specialist Wayva Waterman Lyons at wl685@cornell.edu to learn more about the admissions process.

Land Acknowledgement

Cornell University is located on the traditional homelands of the Gayogo̱hó꞉nǫ' (the Cayuga Nation). The Gayogo̱hó꞉nǫ' are members of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, an alliance of six sovereign Nations with a historic and contemporary presence on this land. The Confederacy precedes the establishment of Cornell University, New York State, and the United States of America.  We acknowledge the painful history of Gayogo̱hó꞉nǫ' dispossession, and honor the ongoing connection of Gayogo̱hó꞉nǫ' people, past and present, to these lands and waters.

AIISP has submitted this land acknowledgement to traditional Gayogo̱hó꞉nǫ' leaders for their consideration and approval.  We will post a final version as soon as it is available.

 

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Upcoming Events

Dec 2
|
12:00 pm

AIISP Leadership Development Spotlight

Weekly series that explores four themes: Student Spotlight, Professional Spotlight, Wellness Spotlight, and Indigenous Spotlight. This weeks features Medidation Session from Cornell Health.
Location:
Dec 3
|
4:30 pm

Archaeological Science Group Lecture: Keolu Fox

"Creating accountability in human population genetics using base editing tools" The Archaeological Science Group at Cornell and the American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program are pleased to co...
Location:
Event type:
Lecture
Dec 4
|
11:30 am

AIIS Speaker Series: "Indigenous Data Sovereignty: Strawberries, Data and Meeting Kin in the Archive"

Measures and metrics of racial disparities in health and social inequality data—despite their claims to inclusion or eventual repair—often retrench and naturalize an historical figure of a damaged,...
Location:
Event type:
Lecture
Dec 4
|
12:00 pm

Self-Devouring Growth Book Talk

Julie Livingston will talk about her recent book Self-Devouring Growth: A Planetary Parable as Told from Southern Africa (Duke University Press, 2019)....
Location:
Event type:
Lecture

AIISP Statement of Solidarity

The American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program at Cornell University condemns the murders of Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Regis Korchinski-Paquet, and George Floyd and the ongoing acts and structures of racialized and racist violence directed at Black people, and other people of color on this continent.  We stand in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement in the continuing search for justice and a future that is better than the world we have now.

For additional perspectives, see the statement by the Council of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA) and the article, "To Breathe Together: Co-Conspirators for Decolonial Futures" by Sefanit Habtom and Megan Scribe.

Current News

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Fidelia “Flying Bird” Fielding in 1902. Photo provided to Cornell Chronicle.

Return of Mohegan elder’s diaries to help revitalize language

Nov 16, 2020

The diaries of the last fluent speaker of the Mohegan-Pequot language have returned home.
On Nov. 4, the papers of Fidelia “Flying Bird” Fielding, who died in 1908, were transferred from Cornell University Library to the Mohegan Tribe. Mohegan Tribal Historic Preservation Officer James Quinn traveled from Uncasville, Connecticut, to Cornell’s Ithaca campus to receive the rare manuscripts from Gerald R. Beasley, the Carl A. Kroch University Librarian.

Professor Jeffrey Palmer headshot

Cornell Chronicle: Filmmaker Jeff Palmer (Kiowa) tells Native Americans’ untold stories

Oct 9, 2020

Jeffrey Palmer uses Indigenous storytelling techniques to reveal Native Americans’ untold stories while pushing the limits of documentary film. An assistant professor of performing and media arts in the College of Arts and Sciences (A&S), Palmer has been nominated for an Emmy Award and his films have appeared in major festivals, from the Sundance Film Festival to the Berlin Independent Film Festival.