Prof. Denise Green - Wedding Dress Collaboration

Prof. Denise Green - Wedding Dress Collaboration

Iroquois Nationals Win Bronze Medal

Iroquois Nationals Win Bronze Medal

Bailee Hopkins - FSAD Natural Dye Garden

Bailee Hopkins - FSAD Natural Dye Garden

Residence Hall Director - Job Opportunity

Residence Hall Director - Job Opportunity
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Welcome

The American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program (AIISP) provides a unique combination of American Indian and Indigenous Studies (AIIS) courses, student leadership opportunities and Akwe:kon, the first Native student residence hall in North America. The AIISP has affiliated faculty in the fields of Art, Art History, Anthropology, Archeology, English, Education, Fiber Science, History, Horticulture, Indigenous Studies, Linguistics, Natural Resources and Philosophy. The AIISP supports the Indigenous Graduate Student Association (IGSA), Native American Law Student Association (NALSA), American Indian and Engineering Society (AISES), Native American Students at Cornell (NASAC), Hawai’i Club and Pacific Islander Student Association. Indigenous applicants are encouraged to contact the AIISP to learn more about the admissions process; contact Kathy Halbig, klh37@cornell.edu

Cornell University is located in the traditional homelands of the Gayogohó:no (Cayuga Nation), one of the six Haudenosaunee nations.

AIISP Events Calendar

 

 

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Upcoming Events

Sep 24
|
12:15 pm

Indigenous Education in Brazil and Government Policies

Rondon Adugoenau, Researcher Federal University of Mato Grosso (UFMT) --- Bororo Leader...
Location:
Uris Hall
Event type:
Lecture
Oct 5
|
11:15 am

As We Have Always Done

In this ground-breaking follow up to the critically acclaimed Dancing on Our Turtle’s Back, renowned Michi Saagiig NIshnaabeg academic, writer and musician, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson recasts...
Location:
Caldwell Hall
Event type:
Lecture
Oct 19
|
11:15 am

Factors for Technological Appropriateness of Renewable Energy Options in Indian Country

Tribes are shifting to investing in renewable energy projects. Technological appropriateness is fundamental to knowing which renewable energy project is a viable investment for tribes. Because...
Location:
Caldwell Hall
Event type:
Lecture
Nov 4
|
11:15 am

Parallels Between Discourses in Identity, Indigenous Education Sovereignty, and Rehumanizing Mathematics Education

In the era of Trump, we have seen renewed and explicit policies and practices aimed to further dehumanize historically marginalized communities. Indigenous peoples will note their own histories of...
Location:
Caldwell Hall
Event type:
Lecture
Nov 16
|
11:15 am

Waaki-Sanctuary

The idea of Sanctuary in our time is colored by the politics of human immigration. As contemporary media consumers, we are saturated with threats and security measures originating from alerts about...
Location:
Caldwell Hall
Event type:
Lecture

Current News

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Oneida Nation Sundance Film Festival

Sep 20, 2018
The Oneida Indian Nation would like to invite you to an exciting collaborative short film series with Sundance Institute at Turning Stone Resort on Oct. 13, beginning at 8 p.m. The series will showcase several short films by award winning Native American filmmakers from across the country and offer opportunities to discuss them with directors such as Shaandiin Tome. The partnership is designed to expand the reach of Native storytellers in Upstate New York through local film screenings and workshops, as well as a yearlong Fellowship for one local aspiring Native filmmaker, who will be announced in early 2019.

If you are interested in attending the October 13 film series event at Turning Stone or have any questions, please contact Sarah.Koral@turningstone.com or 315.361.8191.
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Akwe:kon Press awarded 2018 digitization grant

Sep 11, 2018
Seasoned documents and artifacts are starting fresh digital lives through the Grants Program for Digital Collections in Arts and Sciences, which is funding seven projects this year. Chosen from 15 applications, the Akwe:kon Press, an online collection of publications run by Cornell’s American Indian Program (now the American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program or AIISP) from 1984 to 2002, was selected. Jolene Rickard (history of art, AIISP) leads the project in collaboration with Urszula Piasta-Mansfield (AIISP) to disseminate and promote Native American and indigenous voices and perspectives within and beyond academia.
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Professor Denise Green collaborates with Indigenous peoples and uses body-scan technology to create traditional Nuu-chah-nulth inspired wedding dress.

Professor Denise Green collaborates with Indigenous peoples and uses body-scan technology to create traditional Nuu-chah-nulth inspired wedding dress.

Jul 22, 2018
This wedding gown is a collaborative design by Denise Nicole Green and Haa'yuups (who also holds the names Chuuchkamalthnii and Ki-ke-in, among many other indigenous names, and the English name Ron Hamilton), and was created for Naasquuisaqs (who also holds the names Ha'wilthmachiilth and Chakwasikwilthim, and the English name Shaunee Casavant) to wear during her marriage to Tl'aakwakumlth ("Tony" Michael Anthony Hanson).  The crests were designed by Haa'yuups and represent the wealth of the two families brought together through the marriage: the repeating dorsal fins are a reference to the name Chakwasikwilthim "Dorsal Fin Woman," a name that came from Naasquuisaqs's maternal great-great-grandmother, Puunii-ii (Polly).  Puunii-ii was a Hiikuulthat-h woman of status who had the right to the dorsal fin of any whale caught in her territory.  The copper heraldry at the front of the dress represents the name Tl'aakwakumlth, which translates to "covered in copper wealth."

The design process began with Naasquuisaqs traveling from her haahuulthii (traditional territory) in the Alberni Valley to Cornell University, where she was body scanned with a 3-D body scanner.  Her scan was reduced to half-scale, cross-sections of her body scan were cut from foam using a flat bed laser cutter and then reconstructed into a half-scale dress form of her exact body (see attached image).  Working in half-scale allowed Professor Green to drape the dress design while minimizing fabric waste, and ensurred perfect fit since the form was an exact copy of Naasquuisaqs's body.  Once the design was draped, a flat pattern was created, digitized, and doubled in size to become full scale.  The pattern pieces were cut from silk dupioni and silk charmeuse, stay-stitched, and then painted with black dye, copper paint, and a blue dye created from antique Reckitt's Crown Laundry Blueing.  In the 19th century when Nuu-chah-nulth people (and Northwest Coast indigenous peoples more broadly) gained access to laundry blueing through trade, they began mixing it with various mediums to create paints that were used on masks, headdresses, shawls, rattles, ceremonial screens, and other forms of regalia. Using antique laundry blueing ensured that the blue on her dress matched this ultramarine.  After the individual pattern pieces were painted, they were sewn together and the dress was brought to Naasquuisaqs three days before her wedding.  By using a mannequin developed from her 3-D body scan, the dress fit perfectly and no adjustments were required after fitting the dress.     

The wedding took place at the Hupacasath House of Gathering on June 30, 2018 and the proceedings were filmed and photographed by Professor Green, with permission of the family.